Soccer and Advertising Profitability in the U.S.


Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

1056736_64357480Right now, we are amidst one of the most exciting times the world experiences every 4 years. The 2014 World Cup tournament, taking place in Brazil, has once again proven to be one of the most exciting ventures for global brands to market their products to huge, in-tuned audience bases.

Now, as I know many of you will say, particularly here in the United States, soccer is a sub-par product. But, on the world level, it’s by far the most respected sport. Only here in America is it not.

So, this is also one opportunity in which the world’s ad revenue doesn’t rely on the United States to match history. Not necessary. Any worldwide global brand gets it.

I read an interesting piece the other day about why soccer isn’t more popular in the United States. One writer contributed to the fact that the games are too long. Games are 90 minutes. That may seem long, but think about the last football game you watched…or baseball game. Those games average on 3-4 hours a piece. Some writers complain there is not enough “action” or scoring in the game. Well, if you haven’t been watching this year’s tournament, you are missing a scoring barrage happening right now. Games ending 5-1 and 3-2 and so on.

But what another writer contributed, which made the most sense to me, is that soccer isn’t viewed as a profitable sport in the United States. Now, that’s not to say that American’s aren’t buying soccer merchandise, but more to say that American brands cannot capitalize on advertising to those audience bases during games, due to its set up. Games are 45 minute,uninterrupted halfs, with a modest 15 minute halftime. That doesn’t give American brands the opportunity to showcase their products enough…or so they say.

So it’s really just commercial advertising time they can’t get their hands on. There is certainly sponsorships available on uniforms, stadiums, etc. So, is it that American brands can’t get the commercial time they need, or are they hesitant to support something unfamiliar on our turf?

But, we will see over the next few weeks how the global brands have fared with their investment in the tournaments.